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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

WHY DO WE ELECT IDIOTS AND LIARS TO RUN SANTA CLARA?

Its very simple Mayor Matthews & councilmembers. Present evidence of another city which spent "x" amount of taxpayer money hosting the Super Bowl and garnered a huge profit from doing so. Didn't our municipal government learn anything from San Francisco hosting the America's Cup?

Santa Clara on the hook for $2 million in Super Bowl events despite huge San Francisco-based fundraising haul

POSTED:   11/24/2014 04:05:55 PM PST35 COMMENTS| UPDATED:   ABOUT 15 HOURS AGO


SANTA CLARA -- Although Super Bowl 50 organizers have raised $40 million to fund a week of events throughout the Bay Area, the city hosting the actual game -- Santa Clara -- will be on its own to pay for a slate of festivities showing itself off to the world.
Santa Clara officials on Monday unveiled a $2 million package of about a dozen events leading up to the February 2016 game at the new Levi's Stadium, headlined by a parade and fireworks extravaganza. But the city will have to start from scratch to raise private money for the showcase -- and if that campaign falls short, taxpayers will be on the hook.
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during  the ribbon cutting ceremony at the new $1.3 billion Levi’s stadium,  July 17, 2014, in Santa Clara,
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during the ribbon cutting ceremony at the new $1.3 billion Levi's stadium, July 17, 2014, in Santa Clara, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)
Most of the money raised by a San Francisco-based Super Bowl Host Committee will be funneled into San Francisco, where the bulk of the "official" activities will be held, 45 miles from the 49ers' new stadium. The problem for the host committee, which has been planning the events for more than 18 months, is that the Santa Clara-based festivities are new and not included in the original Super Bowl plan and budget.
Santa Clara leaders, who took on huge publicly-backed loans to fund the new stadium, have been deferential to the host committee since the city gave away the official Super Bowl host gig to San Francisco two years ago so the 49ers could escape the last year of its Candlestick Park lease.
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"We knew what we were getting into when we did this," said Santa Clara Councilwoman Lisa Gillmor, a stadium supporter who's helped the city plan its own Super Bowl events.
The Santa Clara City Council on Tuesday is set to approve its slate of events and the hiring of a private fundraiser. If that effort falls short, the remaining money will come from a city fund that pays for infrastructure improvements such as sidewalk repairs and sewer line maintenance. Local Super Bowl organizers had promised no public money would be used to fund the game and associated events, though the Santa Clara festivities are not considered part of the official Super Bowl program.
The list of Santa Clara events, brainstormed by city officials over the last several months, is topped by a $1.2 million parade down Great America Parkway with about 100 floats, celebrating the "50" theme of the NFL's golden anniversary title game. It would be followed by an outdoor food alley, concerts and a fireworks show.
Also on the docket: a $500,000 "Super 50" celebration that includes local food and wine tasting, pep rally and celebrity flag football game; a technology showcase that includes a game countdown clock on the water tower next to the stadium; a $100,000 local art showcase; a Super Bowl exhibit at the convention center; a fun run; and an elegant "Super 50 Black and Gold Ball" featuring sports dignitaries.
One unprecedented option, which city officials conceded might be "pie in the sky," would require NFL permission to live-stream the game for free inside Buck Shaw Stadium.
"Many people will not be able to afford to go to the Super Bowl. We want them to be part of the Super Bowl in any way that we can," Gillmor said. "If it wasn't for Santa Clara residents, the stadium wouldn't be here."
City Manager Julio Fuentes said the cost of the events was also a worthy investment because the Super Bowl offers a rare chance for Santa Clara to show itself off to visitors who might want to do business in the city or return to vacation. He said they also want to impress the NFL, which will ultimately have to decide whether the region deserves to host future Super Bowls.
The city will still get a piece of the $40 million raised by the Super Bowl Host Committee to ensure Santa Clara does not lose money operating the actual game, Media Day and tailgate at the stadium, as it will be reimbursed for public costs like police overtime. And the host committee, which wields the star power of local celebrities, sports stars and CEOs, has vowed to lend a hand in the city's fundraising campaign.
"We applaud Santa Clara for working to put together additional Super Bowl 50 events for the Santa Clara community," said host committee spokesman Nathan Ballard. "We've been working together with city officials to support these efforts in any way that we can."
Ballard said that includes taking the lead on funding and planning the actual Super Bowl, which will be a "huge boon to the city of Santa Clara and the whole region."
The host committee, based out of a San Francisco office and led by an appointee of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, has unveiled two separate Golden Gate Bridge-themed logos and held press conferences in the city by the bay, shining the spotlight first and foremost on San Francisco. They've set aside the bulk of hotel rooms and official events, like the NFL Experience interactive theme park and the Main Street landing spot for visitors, for San Francisco.
But the group has recently moved to regionalize the game as a Bay Area-wide event, scrapping its "SF Super Bowl" theme, website address and social media hashtag and adding a former Santa Clara mayor to its 39-person advisory committee. While Apple, Google, Intel, Yahoo and other Silicon Valley giants have each chipped in $2 million for the game, companies from throughout the region, such as Old Navy and Kaiser, have donated as well, and destinations such as Wine Country and Pebble Beach could also host some pre-game festivities.
One-fourth of the money raised by the host committee will go toward charity, a record for a Super Bowl, with organizers announcing Monday that the first grant details -- aimed at impoverished youth and young adults -- will be unveiled Dec. 2.
Contact Mike Rosenberg at 408-920-5705. Follow him at Twitter.com/RosenbergMerc.
Super Bowl 50 event schedule for Santa Clara
Dec. 4, 2015: Super 50 tree lightingDec. 19, 2015: 50-day countdown to game begins with local art showcase
Ongoing: Technology initiatives, including countdown clock on stadium water tower
Dec. 26, 2015 to Jan. 2, 2016: Super Bowl exhibit at the Santa Clara Convention Center
Jan. 2, 2016: Charitable 5k, 10k and kids run, and health expo
Jan. 8, 2016: Super 50 Black and Gold Ball featuring celebrities at the convention center
Jan. 31, 2016: Parade, concert and fireworks show
Feb. 5, 2016: Events around town, including celebrity flag football; local wine and food tasting; a pep rally featuring Great America theme park characters; and an NFL PLAY 60 practice
Feb. 6, 2016: Super Bowl at Levi's Stadium; if permission granted by NFL, the game would be live-streamed inside Buck Shaw Stadium
Source: city of Santa Clara

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

PROVE IT MAYOR MATTHEWS ! ! ! ! !

BE TRANSPARENT! IF LEVI'S STADIUM IS ALREADY A FINANCIAL BOON FOR SANTA CLARA TAXPAYERS, THEN RELEASE ALL OF THE MOST CURRENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF THE SANTA CLARA STADIUM AUTHORITY. LET THE PUBLIC SEE THE BALANCE SHEET, INCOME STATEMENTS, BANK RECORDS, ETC.


Santa Clara's incumbent mayor Jamie Matthews re-elected; incumbent Patrick Kolstad also wins

POSTED:   11/05/2014 06:27:08 AM PST4 COMMENTS| UPDATED:   ABOUT 14 HOURS AGO
Mayor Jamie L. Matthews beat out a challenger for his seat Tuesday in a race that, for him and two city council seats, had been a referendum of sorts on the construction of Levi's Stadium, the commercial projects around it, and a quirky voting system that hinders the election of newcomers and people of color.
Matthews beat challenger Deborah Bress, a small business owner backed by the upstart group, Santa Clara Plays Fair in a more than 2 to 1 lead. Plays Fair criticized Matthews and his pro-stadium allies for giving the San Francisco 49ers football team a sweetheart deal at the expense of Santa Clara taxpayers.
The mayor and his allies responded by saying their pro-growth policies pulled Santa Clara out of the recession faster than most cities, that the stadium is already paying off for taxpayers, and that a minority candidate would break through eventually without changing the voting system.
In Santa Clara, candidates for council run for any of six, at-large seats that come open on a rotating basis. Voters also elect the mayor. Each council race included a familiar face at City Hall, a candidate backed by stadium critics, and one who claims to be independent from both camps.
For open Seat 2, incumbent Patrick Kolstad beat out Karen Hardy, a technology science teacher, who was also backed by Plays Fair, and Mohammed Nadeem, an Indo-American professor and businessman.
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Former councilman Dominic Caserta appeared to have won the other seat with nearly 39.58 percent of the votes in the race for Seat 5, Kevin Park, a scientist, engineer and teacher, was close behind him with 34.65 percent, followed by businesswoman Roseann Alderete LaCoursiere, making the race too close to call early Wednesday morning.
It was not immediately clear how ballots were left to count in Santa Clara.

Monday, November 3, 2014

MCL ELECTION 2014 ENDORSEMENTS

SANTA CLARA CITY COUNCIL:   

1. KAREN HARDY- SHE WILL ENSURE THAT VITAL CITY RESOURCES ARE NOT ALLOCATED FOR THE FUTURE PROBLEMS OF LEVI'S STADIUM. HER OPPONENTS WILL NOT COMMIT TO PROTECTING OUR TAXPAYERS DOLLARS.

2. KEVIN PARK-PROBABLY THE SMARTEST PERSON TO EVER RUN FOR SANTA CLARA CITY COUNCIL. AND THE GIVEN FACT I DO NOT WANT DOMINIC CASERTA TO REPRESENT OUR CITY IN ANY WAY.

SANTA CLARA UNIFIED SCHOOL BOARD:

1. DR. INA BENDIS - SHE WILL CONTINUE TO MAKE EDUCATING OUR STUDENTS THE TOP PRIORITY WITHOUT BENDING TO THE UNION DEMANDS OF THE DISTRICT EMPLOYEES.

2. DR. CHRISTINE KOLTERMANN- SHE WILL CONTINUE TO THE BE VOICE OF THE RESIDENTS AND TAXPAYERS OF SCUSD. HER OPPONENTS HAVE SHOWN THEY WILL BE THE VOICE OF THEIR UNIONS AND THE SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS.


MEASURE H-SCUSD BOND MEASURE

1. THE MCL URGES A NO VOTE ON MEASURE H. SCUSD RESIDENTS WERE PROMISED THAT MONIES FROM MEASURE J (STADIUM MEASURE) WOULD BE USED TO IMPROVE OUR SCHOOLS. SO FAR, THAT HAS YET TO MATERIALIZE. MEASURE H IS  NOT GOOD FOR THE TAXPAYERS.

PROPOSITION 45:

1. THE MCL URGES A YES VOTE ON PROPOSITION 45. IF THE HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANIES ARE SPENDING MILLIONS TO OPPOSE IT, THAT MEANS ITS GOOD FOR THE CONSUMER. HEALTH INSURANCE RATES ARE EXCESSIVE AND THEY NEED TO BE CONTROLLED. THE PRIVATE SECTOR HAS NOT BEEN WILLING TO DO SO.

PROPOSITION 46

1. A SOFT YES FOR THIS PROPOSITION. IF THE TWEEK A FEW ISSUES WHICH DON'T HEAVILY FAVOR THE TRIAL LAWYERS, INSTEAD OF ENSURING THE PATIENT RECEIVES JUSTICE, I WOULD STRONGLY SUPPORT IT.

L.A. TO NFL....................

And the author uses Levi's Stadium as an example for not having an NFL team in Southern  California      

L.A. to NFL: Drop dead

Photo by Warren Little—Getty Images

A local makes the radical case for not welcoming a pro football franchise back to the City of Angels.

Mayor Eric Garcetti says Los Angeles shouldn’t give taxpayer dollars to the National Football League. I disagree. L.A. would be wise to pay the NFL—to stay out of Southern California.
Unfortunately, 20 years after the Raiders and Rams left town, the very bad idea of luring the NFL back is gaining momentum. Los Angeles just extended a downtown stadium deal agreement that was expiring. The NFL is surveying rich Angelenos to see if they’d buy season tickets. Garcetti himself says it’s “highly likely” a team will relocate here soon.
So there’s no time to waste in stopping the drive for a new team. The arguments against bringing the NFL are so strong and numerous that I can’t list them all in a short column, but here are a few:
An NFL team would add to our deep bench of dubious celebrities.
The L.A. media already has enough athletes and other celebrities to distract TV stations and newspapers from covering things that actually matter; we don’t need to add a team of rambunctious football players to our Kardashian culture. And then there are our sports team owners. After the damage Frank McCourt and Donald Sterling did to our civic fabric, why risk bringing another rich and crazy person to town?
An NFL team in L.A. would cannibalize existing businesses.
Studies show that adding a pro sports franchise doesn’t add to a city’s wealth. Instead, it redistributes existing dollars away from other entertainment options to the new franchise. Since the three teams likely to relocate to L.A. are the Oakland Raiders, San Diego Chargers or St. Louis Rams, we’d be stealing from our fellow Californians, or from pitiable Midwesterners who don’t enjoy L.A.’s wide range of cultural offerings.
A new team would be wasteful.
The NFL requires cities to build a new football stadium in order to get a team, but L.A. already has more than enough stadiums to go around. Pasadena has spent nearly $200 million modernizing the Rose Bowl, USC is fixing up the Coliseum, and baseball’s Dodgers and Angels play in stadiums fully capable of hosting NFL games. If you want to see what can go wrong with a brand-new stadium, check out the parking, traffic, and fan violence problems at the 49ers’ Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara.
A new team might be bad for Los Angeles’ own football fans.
Just as ocean life often thrives around collapsed oil rigs, the absence of the NFL has allowed a delicate football ecology to flourish in the City of Angels. Our TV stations air the best pro games from across the country. On Sundays, Angelenos with roots across the nation gather together dressed in their hometown teams’ jerseys. And if you absolutely must see the NFL in person, the Chargers are just a train ride away in San Diego.
Despite all this, many of our leaders insist that a city of our grandeur should have an NFL team. They also promise that such a team will cost L.A. nothing. If you believe that, I’d like to take a bet from you on the Raiders winning this year’s Super Bowl.
The city’s current deal for a downtown stadium, while providing for a private company to pay for a stadium, uses public land and requires the city to sell some $300 million in bonds to build new convention space. Of course, the NFL hasn’t embraced even that deal—it doesn’t want its owner paying the $1.5 billion cost of a new stadium—and is shopping around Southern California for better terms.
The NFL could offer other lures to draw public subsidies—giving L.A. two teams instead of just one, or committing to hosting multiple Super Bowls here. And even if taxpayers escape paying for a football stadium now, a team, once here, would almost certainly come back for handouts in the future. Ask yourself: Do you trust the L.A. political and business leaders who just lined up behind a $1.6 billion tax giveaway to Hollywood to stick to a hard line against public support for a pro football team? Me neither.
With the NFL determined to come here, L.A’s best hope may be to offer incentives to stay away. When you think of all the costs of having a team—stadium costs now in and in the future, additional traffic, the dollars that football would divert away from other entertainment options, and all the time wasted on the NFL drama—paying off the NFL becomes a bargain.
Together, the county and city should offer the league $100 million in exchange for a guarantee never to put a team here. And what if the league turns it down, you ask? That, at the very least, would make the reality undeniable: The NFL wants to take L.A. for all it’s worth.

Sunday, November 2, 2014

IS THIS NOW THE CURSE OF LEVI'S STADIUM?

Remember how one particular person kept stating if the 49ers were playing at a new football stadium instead of Candlestick Park they'd be winning all the time?



San Francisco 49ers starting quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) fumbles the ball against the St. Louis Rams late in the fourth quarter of their NFL game at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014.  (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)
SANTA CLARA -- Colin Kaepernick endured a career-high eight sacks and lost a fumble at the St. Louis Rams' goal line with two seconds remaining Sunday, sealing a stunning 13-10 49ers defeat at Levi's Stadium.
A replay review failed to reverse the ruling that Kaepernick had fumbled while trying to score on a quarterback sneak, sending the 49ers (4-4) to their second straight defeat.
Down by a field goal with 3:11 to play, the 49ers took over at their own 12-yard line and mounted an overdue drive.
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) runs from the grasp of St. Louis Rams cornerback Trumaine Johnson during the second quarter of an NFL
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) runs from the grasp of St. Louis Rams cornerback Trumaine Johnson during the second quarter of an NFL football game in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) ( Ben Margot )
It started with a 25-yard catch-and-run by Stevie Johnson, and the 49ers broke into field-goal range on Anquan Boldin's 20-yard catch-and-run to the Rams 35. Faced with third-and-5 with 51 seconds remaining, Kaepernick threw a fade pass to Michael Crabtree at the 5, drawing a pass-interference penalty on Trumaine Johnson. Kaepernick then went back to Crabtree in the end zone, where Johnson got called for a holding penalty.
Kaepernick threw a short pass to Crabtree, who was dropped just short of the goal line on a play that was upheld on review. Then Kaepernick threw away a play-action pass before the fateful final snap. As he plunged through the line, there was no indication of touchdown or fumble -- until Rams linebacker James Laurinaitis emerged from the scrum with the ball.
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Starting their fifth different offensive line this season, the 49ers took a 10-3 lead before stumbling for most of the remaining 40 minutes.
The last-place Rams (3-5) constantly harassed Kaepernick with an assortment of pressure packages. They had no sacks in a 31-17 home loss to the 49ers on Oct. 13, and only one through their first five games.
Helping offset the 49ers' offensive woes was a standout defensive performance by Chris Borland, who was starting in place of an injured Patrick Willis (toe) for the second straight game.
Borland's 17th tackle of the game forced the Rams to settle for a 39-yard field goal with 5:25 remaining, and Greg Zuerlein made that kick to put the Rams ahead 13-10.
Setting up that go-ahead kick was a comedy of errors by the 49ers: three consecutive penalties backed them up to their own 1-yard line, followed by the eighth sack of Kaepernick, then a 23-yard shanked punt by Andy Lee.
The aforementioned penalties: unsportsmanlike conduct on Bruce Ellington for throwing the ball at a Rams player after a fair-catch punt return, then back-to-back false-start penalties on Mike Iupati and Frank Gore.
The 49ers fell to 1-2-1 coming off a bye under coach Jim Harbaugh.
The Rams had six sacks by halftime, matching their total from their previous seven games combined. The 49ers allowed six sacks last game against Denver. Center Marcus Martin's debut marked the 49ers' fifth offensive line group in eight games.
Each team converted a second-quarter turnover into a touchdown for a 10-10 tie entering halftime.
The 49ers had taken a 10-3 lead by parlaying Antoine Bethea's backpedaling interception into an eventual 27-yard touchdown pass from Kaepernick to Boldin.
But the Rams' fifth sack of Kaepernick produced a fumble -- Robert Quinn got past left tackle Joe Staley -- and three snaps later the game was tied at 10. Austin Davis found Kenny Britt wide open for a 21-yard touchdown 1:04 before halftime.
The 49ers' opening series produced a 34-yard field goal from Phil Dawson, after Kaepernick overthrew Crabtree in the end zone on third-and-10. The Rams pulled even at 3-3 when Zuerlein connected on a 37-yard field goal with 1:20 left in the first quarter.
For more on the 49ers, see Cam Inman's Hot Read blog at blogs.mercurynews.com/49ers. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/CamInman.
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